Tag Archives: personalized health care

Future of Diabetes Diagnosis, with Help from Pharmacogenetics: Dozens of Type 2 Subtypes

Personalized health care in the context of diabetes, and especially Type 2, someday is likely to involve the diagnosis of patients with one of multiple diabetes subtypes based on an individual’s biological symptoms, physical characteristics and genetic profile, according to Ewan Pearson, a clinical senior lecturer at the University of Dundee in Scotland.

Speaking at a plenary session of the 2012 Global Diabetes Summit hosted by Ohio State’s Diabetes Research Center at Wexner Medical Center, Pearson outlined how stratifying diabetes patients by the origins of their disease and genetic predispositions that influence their response to drugs could dramatically change how patients are treated.

This practice could be a long way off, he said, or, “Who knows? This might not be too far away.”

Pearson, also honorary consultant in diabetes & endocrinology at Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, said the current approach to diabetes diagnosis is oversimplified, with the vast majority of cases defined as Type 2 diabetes. Only a tiny percentage are diagnosed as MODY – maturity onset diabetes of the young.

Detailing a number of case studies that make it abundantly clear how different Type 2 diabetes patients can be in terms of biological symptoms and sensitivity to drugs, Pearson suggested that MODY is not considered frequently enough as an alternative diagnosis to Type 2.

Personalized drug treatment could be much more effective in these stratified patients because their genes would offer clues about which medications, and at which doses, will work best for them. For example, studies have already uncovered gene variants that can affect how statins work at different doses – and roughly 90 percent of diabetes patients take these drugs to control cholesterol.

Similar pharmacogenetic research into genetic variants that influence sensitivity to blood sugar-lowering drugs are in their earliest stages. Pearson and colleagues have identified a likely target gene on chromosome 11 that influences the effects of metformin, an enormously popular drug for lowering blood sugar in Type 2 diabetes, but much more work is required to fully understand that gene’s role. Scientists also have some hints about variants that influence response to another class of glucose-control agents as well.

In cases where variants have been identified that affect patient response to drugs, however, the effects are too limited or affect too few people to justify incorporating genomic analysis into clinical care at this point, he noted.

Pearson asserted that pharmacogenetics will continue to advance discoveries that will have clear implications and lead to “good clinical medicine” that will avoid oversimplification.

“I do think this is the future of diabetes and I’m optimistic that we’ll start identifying some subtypes over the course of the next 5 years,” he said.

-Emily Caldwell

Ohio State To Pioneer National Genome Study

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Researchers at the Ohio State University Medical Center are partnering with one of the world’s most prestigious and leading biomedical research institutions, to provide personal genetic information to more than 100,000 people.

Ohio State’s Medical Center and the Coriell Institute for Medical Research, home of the world’s leading biobank resource for human cells and DNA, have officially announced their partnership in the Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative (CPMC). The personalized genetics study will involve an integrated approach to recruiting and enrolling 2,000 study participants at Ohio State, free of charge.

OSU Medical Center is one of only five centers in the country participating in the project with Coriell. Other participants will be enrolled at Fox Chase Cancer Center, Cooper University Hospital, Virtua Health and Helix Health. Study participants will also include volunteers from the Camden, N.J. community, where Coriell is headquartered.

Dr. Clay Marsh, executive director of Ohio State’s Center for Personalized Health Care

Dr. Clay Marsh, executive director of Ohio State’s Center for Personalized Health Care

“Through this collaboration, we will provide the unique opportunity for our community to participate in this ground-breaking national study and move toward wellness-based care that is predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory,” says Dr. Clay Marsh, executive director of Ohio State’s Center for Personalized Health Care.

“We are very excited for this opportunity for Ohio State to partner with the Coriell Institute and to help support their precedent setting study,” adds Marsh.

The Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaboration brings together doctors, patients, geneticists, counselors and information technology experts to create a protected environment for participants to see and understand their personal genomic information, and allow them to make individualized decisions about their health care. This platform will also enable health care providers to utilize the genetic-based information of participants to develop tailored medical and therapeutic treatments.

“Coriell recognizes the Ohio State University Medical Center’s established leadership in personalized healthcare and how this offers a unique setting for the CPMC research study,” says Dr. Michael Christman, president and C.E.O of the Coriell Institute.

“We are committed to creating the future of medicine to improve people’s lives through personalized healthcare,” Marsh adds. “Partnerships like this one will allow us and our community to experience the future of medicine today.”

Coriell Institute for Medical Research is a non-profit, biomedical research institution and the world’s leading biobank resource for human cells and DNA. Founded in 1953, the Coriell Institute conducts research on human genetic variation, mechanisms of cellular differentiation, and inherited genetic disorders. Visit http://cpmc.coriell.org for more information.

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What Does “Personalized Health Care” Mean to You?

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-This is an identical copy of a post on the personal blog of Ryan Squire, the Program Director for Social Media at The OSU Medical Center.  There is very important conversation that must take place in order to shape the future of personalized health care and we need to start that conversation today.

This morning, I had the pleasure of attending a presentation given by Clay Marsh, MD. and senior associate vice president for research in the Office of Health Sciences, vice dean for research in the College of Medicine and executive director of the OSU Center for Personalized Health Care.

marsh_clayDr. Marsh was giving a presentation about personalized health care. It’s a bit of an industry buzz word, and everyone wants to be a part of it, but the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services has a good summary here. Continue reading

Marsh Named To Top Research Post At OSU Medical Center

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Dr. Clay Marsh (43221), an internationally respected Ohio State University scientist and educator, has been named to lead OSU Medical Center’s pioneering research program, one of the largest in the nation. In addition, he will direct the Medical Center’s innovative program for personalized health care.

Clary Marsh, MD. named to top research post at OSU Medical Center

Clary Marsh, MD. named to top research post at OSU Medical Center


The OSU Board of Trustees approved Friday (6/5) Marsh’s appointments as senior associate vice president for research in the Office of Health Sciences, vice dean for research in the College of Medicine and executive director of the OSU Center for Personalized Health Care.

Marsh has been on the medical staff at Ohio State since 1985 and most recently, as its director, helped elevate the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine to a position of national prominence. He also serves as director of the Center for Critical Care and Respiratory Medicine.

In his new roles he will lead planning and expansion of OSU Medical Center’s myriad research endeavors, which from 2000-2008 increased in funding by more than $120 million to $199.4 million.

Marsh also will be responsible for recruitment of key researchers and lead the introduction of advanced technology initiatives to the Medical Center.

Marsh will actively advance the Medical Center’s growing reputation as an international leader in personalized health care, a field that utilizes genetic-based information to develop tailored medical treatments.

The treatments can be adapted for individuals and focus on transforming medicine from a reactive, population and disease-based approach, to the practice of proactive, personalized and wellness-based medicine.

In making the appointments, Dr. Steven Gabbe, senior vice president for Health Sciences and CEO of OSU Medical Center, said Marsh is an exceptional person in all respects.

“Clay is one of Ohio State’s best examples of a top performer,” said Gabbe. “He excels as a scientist, clinician, teacher and administrator, and he has the ability to lead people and programs to their highest levels.

“With Clay’s leadership the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine has become the benchmark for similar programs around the country,” added Gabbe. In recent years, the program has been ranked consistently among America’s best by U.S. News & World Report magazine.

Marsh has won numerous teaching awards and has been recognized nationally for his research and devotion to teaching and mentorship of medical students, residents and fellows.

He has published more than 230 journal articles, abstracts and book chapters, and holds one patent with five more pending. He is associate editor of the Journal of Investigative Medicine and the American Journal of Physiology.

He also has served as chairman of the board of the Stanley Sarnoff Research Foundation and as a national leader in pulmonary medicine on the Battelle Bioinitiative in Pulmonary Medicine.

He earned his medical degree from West Virginia University and completed his residency in internal medicine at Ohio State, where he served as chief resident.
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