Tag Archives: heart disease

Tests to Predict Heart Problems and Stroke May Be More Useful Predictor of Memory Loss than Dementia Tests

Captured by the American Academy of Neurology

Risk prediction tools that estimate future risk of heart disease and stroke may be more useful predictors of future decline in cognitive abilities, or memory and thinking, than a dementia risk score, according to a new study published in the April 2, 2013, print issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

“This is the first study that compares these risk scores with a dementia risk score to study decline in cognitive abilities 10 years later,” said Sara Kaffashian, PhD, with the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM) in Paris, France.

The study involved 7,830 men and women with an average age of 55. Risk of heart disease and stroke (cardiovascular disease) and risk of dementia were calculated for each participant at the beginning of the study. The heart disease risk score included the following risk factors: age, blood pressure, treatment for high blood pressure, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, total cholesterol, smoking, and diabetes. The stroke risk score included age, blood pressure, treatment for high blood pressure, diabetes, smoking, history of heart disease, and presence of cardiac arrhythmia (irregular heart beat). Read more….

Heart Month 2012 – Today is the best time to improve your heart health!

 Heart disease, including stroke, is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States, killing an estimated 630,000 Americans each year.

 You are at higher risk of heart disease if you are:

 • A woman age 55 or older           • A man age 45 or older

 • Or a person with a family history of early heart disease

 Heart disease can be prevented. To keep your heart healthy:

 • Watch your weight

 • Quit smoking and stay away from secondhand smoke

 • Control your cholesterol and blood pressure

 • If you drink alcohol, drink only in moderation

 • Get active and eat healthy

 • Manage stress

Learn more about heart disease and prevention here: http://medicalcenter.osu.edu/heart/prevention/pages/prevention.aspx

OSU Medical Center Needs Your Help Sharing Heart Attack Video with 105,000 This November

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Our STEMI program wants people to be aware of the warning signs of a heart attack, so they’ve created a special video describing the symptoms of a heart attack. The goal is to have 105,000 people watch the video before the end of November, but we need your help to reach the goal.

Help spread the word! Post one, or all, of the following tweets to your Twitter feed. Feel free to use them throughout the day today, one each day or one each week. When you tweet, be sure to include the hashtag (#KnowTheSigns) in the tweet so we can track our progress.

– Tweet it:

105,000 people have a heart attack each month – enough to fill Ohio Stadium. #KnowTheSigns:  http://twurl.nl/wm1tsc

#KnowTheSigns of a heart attack & share them w/ family & friends: http://twurl.nl/wm1tsc

Help me to teach 105,000 of our closest friends to #knowthesigns. http://twurl.nl/wm1tsc Please RT

E-mail it: Share this video link via e-mail with family, friends and loved ones. Help spread the word about warning signs of a heart attack. http://twurl.nl/wm1tsc

Post it on Facebook: Post this update on your Facebook account to help others learn the warning signs: 105,000 people have a heart attack each month–that’s enough to fill Ohio Stadium. Please share this video http://twurl.nl/wm1tsc with your family and friends, and join The Ohio State University Medical Center in its effort to reach 105,000 people with this important message.

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Know The Signs Of A Heart Attack Before It Hits

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According to the American Heart Association, heart attacks are responsible for about one in five deaths each year. That’s more than 450,000 people. 

You can help reduce these statistics by learning the symptoms of a heart attack and calling 9-1-1 immediately.

Heart attacks can be sudden and intense or start with vague discomfort and pain. Learning the symptoms can help you catch a heart attack early and seek help as soon as possible. 

If you or anyone you know experience these symptoms, call 9-1-1 immediately:

  • Chest discomfort, sometimes described as pressure, fullness or squeezing, that lasts more than a few minutes or goes away and comes back. 
  • Uncomfortable feelings in other parts of the upper body, such as pain in one or both arms, the neck, back, jaw or stomach.
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Cold sweats, nausea or lightheadedness.

Calling 9-1-1 is the fastest way to get treatment. EMS can start treatment as soon as they arrive on the scene, driving yourself to the hospital can delay this important first step of care.

Read more about what puts you at risk for heart attacks.

Leaders in Heart Attack Care
New technology and a close collaboration with emergency medical service providers is drastically reducing the amount of time it takes for heart attack patients to receive life-saving treatment at Ohio State University Medical Center. Since the initiative began last year, the time it takes patients arriving at the hospital with severe heart attacks to receive specialized care has been reduced by nearly half.

Read more about Ohio State’s special team.

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