Video Games Help Patients and Health Care Providers

Captured by University of Utah

Can video games help patients with cancer, diabetes, asthma, depression, autism and Parkinson’s disease? A new publication by researchers from the University of Utah, appearing in the Sept 19 issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine, indicates video games can be therapeutic and are already beginning to show health-related benefits.

The lead author of the paper “Patient-Empowerment Interactive Technologies” is Carol Bruggers, a professor in the University of Utah’s Department of Pediatrics and physician at Primary Children’s Medical Center. Contributing to the paper were other faculty from the University of Utah’s Department of Pediatrics, the Brain Institute, College of Fine Arts, College of Pharmacy, School of Computing, Pierre Lassonde Entrepreneur Center, students who recently graduated from the Entertainment Arts and Engineering (EAE) Master’s program, and a current medical student.

In the Perspectives article, the team describes therapeutic video games, including their own Patient Empowerment Exercise Video Game (PE Game), an activity-promoting game specifically designed to improve resilience, empowerment, and a “fighting spirit” for pediatric oncology patients. The researchers also looked at other games that have been shown to help patients with several chronic diseases.

“Therapeutic video games will push video game design into exciting new directions,” says Robert Kessler, director of EAE. “Meeting the needs of the competing goals of physical therapy through exercise and patient empowerment is extremely challenging. The PE Game is clearly the first of a whole line of research into therapeutic video games.” Read more…

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